Veteran Salute

Veteran Salute: Morse code skills shape vets career in two wars

WICHITA, Kan. (KSNW) - A Bennington native has seen so much in his 95 years, including two wars.

Larry Crow now calls Wichita home and says it was a friend who encouraged him to attend the National Youth Administration.

It was there he learned Morse code, a skill that helped him land in the Navy Air branch.

Larry Crow now enjoys passing time making beautiful creations.

He says the last nine decades have really flown by, and in his days as an aviation radioman, they certainly did.

"I had one of the best pilots anyone could possibly have," WWII and Korean War veteran Larry Crow said.

Crow logged 2,000 hours in sea patrol bombers.

"They had a flight deck behind the pilot, which housed all of our radar equipment on one side of the aisle and all of our radio equipment on the other side."

He says the crew flew night patrols, waiting for Japanese submarines that needed to surface to recharge their batteries.

"So they surfaced at night so they wouldn't be seen."

But Crow and the crew were watching from above.

"Our particular crew, picked them up on radar and then was able to fly over and drop depth charges, so my pilot confirmed we made a hit and it gave me the information which I relayed back to the, to the commander in charge of the fleet.

Following WWII Crow went to college.

He was then recalled for the Korean War and spent time aboard the U.S.S. Boxer.

"Pilots would report that their radio wasn't working correctly, we would go pull the radio, take it the shop, overhaul it and then put it back in the planes."

Crow's second tour of duty took him away from his new bride for nearly two years, but they went on to enjoy 59 years of marriage and raise five children, before she passed.

Just about eight years ago Crow found love again with someone he had known since his freshman year at K State.

His wife Ruby got the very first special time piece he created.

When he's not in his basement making beautiful creations, Crow shares his other talent with many, through the Georgetown Readers Theater.

After he graduated K-State he worked for IBM in the engineering division.

He says when he started there were computer rooms, and he says now he can accomplish so much on just his cell phone.


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