WICHITA, Kan. (KSNW) — A study posted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows alcohol-induced death rates increased from 2019 to 2020, the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the CDC, the increase in rates from 2019 and 2020 was “largely driven by deaths from alcoholic liver disease and mental and behavioral disorders due to use of alcohol.” The deaths from alcoholic liver disease rose by 23%, and 33% for mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of alcohol.

The study says the rates of alcohol-induced deaths have risen from 2000 to 2020, with annual increases of 7% between 2000 and 2018, but the overall age-adjusted rate increased by 26%, from 10.4 per 100,000 in 2019 to 13.1 in 2020.

(Courtesy: CDC)

According to the CDC, the rate was highest for males and females aged 55-64.

“Among females, rates in 2020 were lowest for those under age 25 years (0.1 per 100,000),” the study reads. “Rates increased by age group to 20.1 for those aged 55–64 and then decreased to 2.9 for those aged 85 and over.

“Among males, rates in 2020 were lowest for those under age 25 years (0.3); rates increased by age group to 59.0 for those aged 55–64 and then decreased to 12.8 for those aged 85 and over,” the study reads.

The rates for males were between two and four times higher than those for females in all age groups.

Alcoholic liver disease was the most frequent underlying cause of alcohol-induced deaths between 2019 and 2020. The largest increase in rates was from alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis (50%, from 0.1 to 0.2), followed by mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of alcohol (33%, from three to four).