KANSAS CITY, Kan. (WDAF) — U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg is expected to visit Kansas City, Kansas on Friday, Jan. 28, to discuss the bipartisan infrastructure law and its investment in the area.

President Joe Biden signed his $1 trillion infrastructure deal into law Nov. 15, declaring that the new infusion of cash for roads, bridges, ports and more is going to make life “change for the better” for the American people.

The timing and location of Buttigieg’s visit are unknown at this time.

Buttigieg talked with reporters back in November on the bill’s impact — the promise of more electric cars, intercity train routes, bigger airports — when a pointed question came. How would he go about building racial equity into infrastructure?

The 40-year-old former mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate laid out his argument that highway design can reflect racism, noting that at least $1 billion in the bill will help reconnect cities and neighborhoods that had been racially segregated or divided by road projects.

Rep. Sharice Davids Office has confirmed that she will be joining Buttigieg on his visit.

The 3rd District congresswoman was named vice chair of the full House Committee on transportation and infrastructure in 2021. Davids worked at the U.S. Department of Transportation as a White House Fellow before her election in 2018.

The Biden administration has hoped to use the infrastructure law to build back Biden’s popularity, which has taken a hit amid rising inflation, withdrawing troops and Americans out of Afghanistan and the inability to fully shake the public health and economic risks from COVID-19.

Biden visited Kansas City, Missouri just last month delivering remarks at the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority on the “Building a Better America” deal.

The federal money going to Kansas and Missouri, more than $10 billion as a part of the passed infrastructure law, was touted by Biden to have a far-reaching impact — fixing roads, bridges and sewers and increasing access to broadband internet.

The Associated Press contributed to this article