WASHINGTON — The Department of Justice closed the investigation into the death of Overland Park teenager John Albers.

The Justice Department announced it would end it’s investigation into possible civil rights violations against Clayton Jenison, the former Overland Park Police officer who shot and killed Albers on Jan. 20, 2018.

Federal investigator said they could not prove without a doubt that Jennings willfully violated the federal criminal civil rights statute.

The DOJ said it conducted an extensive investigation into the shooting of the 17-year-old high school student before reaching the decision. Investigators also met with the Albers’ family about the decision.

On Jan. 20, 2018, Albers posted on social media indicating he might do something to harm himself. He was home alone at the time. Two of his friends called 9-1-1 for help.

Jenison and another Overland Park Police officer responded to Albers’ home to check on the teenager.

After officers arrived at the Albers’ home, Jenison decided to stand near the garage door. The door opened and Albers began backing a minivan out of the garage.

Jenison stepped toward the moving vehicle and told Albers to stop. The minivan continued to back down the driveway. The DOJ’s investigation determined that Jenison did not verbally identify himself before he fired two shots into the van.

Video released by the Overland Park Police Department showed the minivan pause before picking up speed. It reversed past Jenison, spun around and came to a stop facing the street.

The van then slowly backed toward the Albers’ home. As the van passed Jenison a second time, he fired another eleven times into the van. The minivan rolled out of the driveway and into the driveway across the street.

The Department of Justice said about 14 second elapsed from the time Albers began backing out of the garage until Jenison fired the final gunshot.

An autopsy determined six of the 13 bullets from Jenison’s gun hit Albers. The teenager was injured in the head, neck, and upper right torso, and died at the scene.

Jenison told investigators that he had shot Albers because he believed the van was going to run him over.

Jenison voluntarily resigned from the police department and is not working as a police officer at this time, according to the DOJ.

Following the deadly shooting Overland Park approved a plan to fund a program to dispatch mental health experts with police to active crime scenes to help people in crisis.