KANSAS CITY, Mo. (WDAF) — Parents in the Kansas City area are concerned with the growing number of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cases.

RSV is an extremely common virus. Nearly everyone is exposed to the pathogen by the time they’re 2 years old. In healthy adults and older children, RSV typically causes mild, cold-like symptoms.

Children’s Mercy Hospital reports that cases seem to be increasing every week. Mothers FOX4 spoke with say watching their child struggling to breathe or constantly coughing is one of the scariest things to witness.

RSV impacts people of all ages and often looks like the common cold, but it can have serious effects, especially for babies or individuals with compromised immune systems.

Alisha Strutton said she knew something was up when her son, Vernon, starting to show signs of what looked like a cold.

“It started on the 15th. It started with watery eyes, a cough, not wanting to eat. Then we get to the 17th. He’s not crawling. He’s not eating,” Strutton said.

Strutton said she eventually took her son to the ER, where her fear was confirmed. Vernon was positive for RSV.

“It’s been hard to watch. You know, it’s because you’re kind of hopeless in the situation,” Strutton said.

Ashley Sperling was recently in the same boat with her baby boy, Mason.

“The first thing we noticed was a cough, which I thought, you know, just seasonal allergies. It didn’t sound like super congested or anything like that,” Sperling said.

Sperling said in less than 24 hours of the baby’s cough symptoms. His condition took a turn.

“His breathing was weird. I was immediately anxious about it. His cough changed from like, kind of like that dry seasonal one to more of a, like wet and kind of gross sounding one,” Sperling said.

While Sperling’s son, Mason, has recovered, Strutton said her son is still struggling with a cough and breathing issues.

These mothers have this message for families with little ones.

“Don’t be afraid to tell your family not to kiss your child. I know, that’s always kind of awkward and uncomfortable. But if it’s not your baby, you don’t need to be kissing on that baby,” Sperling said.